CE Marking

Glendale Engineering (Milfield) Ltd - Lilburn Estates Cattle Building

What is CE Marking?
CE Marking is a declaration by a manufacturer to a customer that their product complies with all relevant EU Legislation for that product.

Does CE Marking affect RIDBA members?
From 1 July 2013, under the Construction Products Regulation 2011 (CPR), it became mandatory for manufacturers to apply CE marking to any of their products which are covered by a harmonised European standard (hEN) or European Technical Assessment (ETA).
All RIDBA members who manufacture frames have met the legal requirements to CE Mark their relevant products and all non-manufacturing members only purchase products which have CE Marking.

Are any products applicable to RIDBA members currently subject to CE Marking?
Since 1 July 2013, steel products which fall under the following standards have been legally required to have CE Marking:
• Open Sections – BS EN 10025-1
• Hollow Sections – BS EN 10210-1 and BS EN 10219-1
• Plates – BS EN 10025-1
• Bolting Assemblies – BS EN 15048-1 and BS EN 14399-1.
Since 1 July 2013, aluminium products which fall under the following standards have been legally required to have CE Marking:
• Windows and doors – BS EN 14351-1
• Curtain Walling – BS EN 13830
Since 1 July 2014, steel and aluminium products which fall under the following standards have been legally required to have CE Marking:
• Execution of steel structures and aluminium structures – BS EN 1090

What is BS EN 1090?
BS EN 1090 Execution of steel structures and aluminium structures is the standard that covers fabricated steel and aluminium structures. The standard consists of three parts:
BS EN 1090-1: Requirements for Conformity Assessment of Structural Components – covers the CE marking of fabricated structures and systems made from CE Marked products
BS EN 1090-2: Technical Requirements for Steel Structures – specifies requirements for the execution of steel structures covering all types of steel and stainless steel structures including buildings, bridges, masts and crane. It includes references to European standards for products, welding, testing, and corrosion protection.
BS EN 1090-3: Technical Requirements for Aluminium Structures – specifies requirements for the execution of aluminium structures, in order to ensure adequate levels of mechanical resistance and stability, serviceability and durability.

Who is affected by CE Marking to BS EN 1090-1?
The regulations apply to a number of activities and affect:
1. Manufacturers of components or kits that have a structural use – RIDBA members who manufacture components or kits that have a structural use for sale ensure that it is CE marked.
2. Purchasers of components or kits that have a structural use – RIDBA members who purchase individual components or kits ensure that they have been CE marked by the manufacturer.
CE marking is regulated by criminal law and, if not adhered to, companies may be fined and, in severe cases, imprisoned. Companies without the correct accreditation in place may be closed down until the proper certification is obtained and be forced to recall non-compliant products already on the market.

What will it mean if I use non-CE Marked components or pre-fabricated structures?
Any products manufactured after 1 July 2014 for sale using the BS EN 1090-1 standard are legally required to have CE Marking. However, CE Marking does not apply retrospectively. So, any products manufactured using the BS EN 1090 standard before the 1 July 2014 can still be legally used and sold after the 1 July 2014. Furthermore, any components or fabricated structures that do not have CE Marking which have been recovered or recycled from sites can be reused on future sites or sold providing they meet the standards laid down in BS EN 1090 providing they are not altered in any way.
RIDBA recommends that you thoroughly read the standards before you purchase any reclaimed or recycled non-CE Marked fabricated structures or individual components for use after 1 July 2014.

What will it mean if a fabricated structure is built on-site using individual components?
CE marking does not apply to products which are manufactured on-site for use on that site. Therefore, if a fabricated structure is built on-site using individual CE marked components; the structure does not require CE marking. However, the structure still has to be built to the standards laid down in BS EN 1090.

How is a manufacturer able to CE Mark a product?
A manufacturer wishing to CE Mark their products are required to have the following documents:
• Factory Production Control (FPC) Certificate – issued by a Notified Inspection Body (NB)
• Welding Certificate for the appointed Responsible Welding Coordinator (RWC) – issued by a NB
• Declaration of Performance (DoP) – issued by the steelwork contractor.

How does a company apply to use CE Marking?
Companies need to apply for accreditation through a Notified Inspection Body (NB) who will assess the company to ensure they operate to a high standard including the following:
• Purchasing systems and components which are CE Marked
• Operating to well-defined specifications
• Developing risk assessments and keeping these updated
• Developing prototypes for assessment and/or calculations to ensure product safety
• Developing and managing a Factory Production Control (FPC) process which covers employee training, maintenance and control of products and record keeping etc.

CE Marking FAQs

For more information about how CE marking may affect your company, contact admin@ridba.org.uk.